Migrant crisis escalates as bickering Euro states shut borders leaving 8,000 stranded


Bickering Euro states turned on eachother as thousands more refugees made their way towards the passport-free Schengen zone.

Macedonia refused to accept more than 8,000 Afghan migrants today – leaving them stuck in Greece – but said it was Serbia”s responsibility.

Meanwhile, Belgrade said the migrants were the responsibility of Slovenia and Austria, who have reduced the number of migrants and refugees coming into their country.

Austria has introduced a daily cap of 80 asylum seekers – seeing it criticised by Germany, who said the decision was “unacceptable”.

Greece”s government warned today it expected a growing number of stranded migrants and asylum seekers.

Ioannis Mouzalas, a deputy minister for migration, said the European Union was failing to deal with unilateral actions and an “outburst of scare-mongering” from individual member states.

Italy’s Prime Minister, Matteo Renzi said he understood Austria was in a “very difficult situation” but added Vienna would be “absolutely wrong” if it shut its borders too. 

Nearly 100,000 migrants and refugees have travelled to Greek islands from nearby Turkey so far this year.

Police said about 2,000 people were stranded at the border camps near the Greek border town of Idomeni, including some 600 Afghans who staged a peaceful protest, holding up Afghan flags and hand-written banners.

Among them was 25-year-old Shafiulahh Qaberi who traveled to Greece from the northern Afghan city of Kunduz.

He said: “We”ve been here for three days, and no one knows why they have closed the border. 

“I don”t need food and I don”t need water. What I need is to get over the border. Why are they stopping us?”

The news comes as the EU’s police organisation Europol launched a new united group dedicated to stopping migrant smuggling.

The continuing crisis is another blow to Schengen which is regarding by many to be on the verge of collapse. 

It was revealed today its closure would cost one trillion pounds over the next decade.