Police head refuses Lord Bramall apology

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Lord Bramall: Met Police chief refuses to apologise

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Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe told the Home Affairs Select Committee he had no reason to apologise

The head of the Metropolitan Police has said he will not be “bullied” into apologising to Lord Bramall, who was investigated in connection with allegations of historical child abuse.

Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe told the Home Affairs Select Committee he had no reason to apologise to the peer, 92.

The police investigation was criticised after Lord Bramall was told he would face no action nearly nine months after he was interviewed under caution.

Lord Bramall had denied the claims.

The former head of the Army was interviewed under caution by police on 30 April 2015 but the case was dropped by the Met, which said last month that there was insufficient evidence to investigate further or bring charges.

“Regret”

Sir Bernard told MPs that suspects such as Lord Bramall had to wait to be told about the outcome of his case until the police and Crown Prosecution Service had completed their work.

He also defended the decision to send 22 officers to search Lord Bramall”s home during the investigation into the abuse allegations.

Sir Bernard expressed “regret” for the effect of the inquiry on Lord Bramall but repeatedly refused to apologise at the parliamentary committee.

During one exchange, Conservative MP Tim Loughton referred to a “media circus” surrounding the case.

Sir Bernard said: “Ah the media circus. If what you mean is that you want me to be bullied into apologising then that won”t happen.”

Mr Loughton replied: “So you think you”re being bullied, do you?”

Sir Bernard said: “I”m asking you whether that”s what you think.”

Image caption
Lord Bramall was interviewed under caution by police on 30 April 2015

Lord Bramall, a Normandy veteran who retired from the House of Lords in 2013, previously told the BBC there was not “one grain of truth” in the allegations, made against him by a man in his 40s.

Lord Bramall served during the D-Day landings during World War Two and commanded UK land forces between 1976 and 1978.

The peer became chief of the general staff – the professional head of the Army – in 1979, and in 1982 he oversaw the Falklands campaign.

Later that year he became chief of the defence staff – the most senior officer commanding the UK”s armed forces.