Monster Energy Drink Fuels Migrants Rush To England


Monster Energy Drink, the go-to pick me up for legions of commuting Brits is now being glugged by exhausted asylum seekers wishing to break through the Channel Tunnel.

Each night hundreds of desperate migrants make the two hour hike from their camp to the Channel Tunnel in a bid to reach the UK, but many rely on the energy drink to give them enough get up and go to climb the massive perimeter fences. 

It has now become part of a daily ritual for the desperate migrants and a best-seller for one Jungle shopkeeper.

Ahmed, 22, from Kabul, runs the site”s convenience stall, which stocks items like pasta, rice and shower gel. 

He said: ”Monster is our best selling item. Before they go on the trucks they come here to buy Monster.

“Every night, about 6pm they buy a Monster and they walk the two hours to get to the Tunnel. People try to get to England all the time and they are much tired. So they drink Monster. Then they wake up and buy another one about midday.”

Drinking the energy drink has become a huge part of life in the camp, with one can containing more than two espressos worth of caffeine.

Boredom, tiredness and lack of decent food take a strain – those in the Jungle get only one free meal per day which is donated at the camp shelter. 

If you are too sick or injured – many have broken arms or legs from climbing fences, falling off lorries or tripping in the night – or in a position where you can”t queue, you simply don”t eat. 

Calais’ 6,000 migrants – many of whom are young men seeking a better life in the UK – will buy cans of Monster, priced 1 Euro 50 cents, from the makeshift camp shop, before trudging through the dark along the expressway towards the tunnel or lorry stops.

The grass surrounding the roads is littered with empty cans of the green and black liveried drink – which comes in Khaos and Assault flavours – showing the route migrants are taking to make the final last few miles to England.

Shopkeepers like Ahmed shop at a nearby Lidl then sell the goods on again for a little profit.

He lives and sleeps in the shop after deciding to open a store to pass the time when he broke his leg attempting to scale a perimeter fence near the Channel Tunnel. 

Within the ad hoc structure are neatly ordered shelves of dried foods, tins, cooking oil and chocolate. 

Other than Monster the best-selling items are cigarettes which he industriously hand rolls himself and sells to customers for just five cents each.

If Ahmed ever reaches the UK he has one place in mind where he would like to work. 

“I’d like my job to be in a chicken shop. A KFC. Some restaurant. It took me two months to get here but I have tried to get in trailers, lorries, all of it. But I am stuck here now. 

“Everybody here is sad, heartbroken. You see so many people get injured – broken legs, arms, faces. I saw a man who had lost his eye.”

Another jungle businessman, Saleem, 46, from Afghanistan has opened a restaurant – for all faiths and backgrounds – selling hot meals. Saleem has failed to reach the UK despite hundreds of attempts at crossing.

He has now opened a successful mini restaurant in the Jungle which gives extra meals and a meeting place for inhabitants.

“If you eat chicken and rice that costs four Euros, other things are much cheaper.

We try and make it economical as we pay no rent in this place and our people have no money here. 

We want a safe place where people can eat without fear of getting hurt.”

As they wait to reach the UK many more of the migrants will be spending their cash on Monster and roll ups in a bid to keep their strength up.