Denmark’s had it with Brussels Borders will REMAIN until EU ‘gets control over crisis”

0
9

Immigration and integration minister, Inger Støjberg, has announced she is set to tell the EU that Denmark will continue the internal border checks, despite being a member of the Schengen Zone. 

The Schengen Agreement, which was signed in 1985, was created to allow citizens of member countries to travel freely without passport checks to other nations within the area.

However, as the unprecedented influx of migrants has placed an enormous strain on the public services in the EU and EEA countries, several of the members have implemented internal border controls

According to the so-called Schengen Borders Code, member countries can impose temporary border controls within the otherwise borderless Schengen area for up to two years. 

Denmark first implemented internal border controls in January this year and has continued to extend the temporary restriction to thwart off illegal migrants attempting to cross its borders. 

Ms Støjberg said Denmark’s position would be presented to the EU in a joint letter from other Schengen countries which have also implemented temporary checks. 

The politician said: “We are working to get sent a joint letter.

“It will say we want an extension of border controls on the basis that there is no control of the external borders and that there are still unregistered refugees and migrants in Europe.

“And to a great extent, the terrorist threat is real and so we must control who comes to Europe.”

Ms Støjberg added: “I consider it a necessity that we extend now. I can only say that we must have the internal border as long as needed.”

European Commissioner Dimitris Avramopoaulos, who will decide whether or not Denmark will be granted an extension, said Denmark would only obtain the continued control if it was “justified”.

Mr Avramopoaulos said: “There are rules that must be respected. Everyone can not just ask for an extension without being able to explain, convince and justify why.”

It comes as Brussels said the decision of several Schengen countries to close their borders and implement internal controls was necessary as it “provided an adequate response to the identified threat to internal security and public policy”, in a report.